Why the Victorian mansion is a horror icon The (mostly) true story of hobo 2 days ago   05:01

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The Gilded Age left a legacy of decay on the American landscape.

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Haunted houses are often depicted with similar features: decaying woodwork, steep angles, and Gothic-looking towers and turrets. The model for this trope is the Victorian mansion, once a symbol of affluence and taste during the Gilded Age - a period of American history marked by political corruption and severe income inequality.

After World War I, these houses were seen as extravagant and antiquated, and were abandoned. Their sinister relationship to the troubling end of the Victorian Era in America eventually led to their depiction as haunted and ghostly in both fine art and pop culture, and is now an unspoken symbol of dread.

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Comments 1639 Comments

Vox
Victorian mansions aren’t the only backdrops for the horrific and macabre — check out our video on the dollhouses of death that revolutionized forensic science forever: http://bit.ly/2Tb56ui
Lilith Rey
I want all those beauties
Tony Alkhoury
The 20th century made the Victorian era scary and dark like the old west in USA
Tony Alkhoury
I like Victorian style homes and technology
Tony Alkhoury
Because it’s old
Lucas Snow
that was a ghost i thought it was just a person lol
Bees!
4:50, I just wanted a concise video on the history the Victorian is horror, but you just HAD to scare the crap out of me!
I'm Fishdogpigsquirrel
I love Victorian houses you’ll never convince me otherwise
Carmen Stigter
Nice ending -_-
Pitti-Sing
Watching season three of "Victoria" now. Makes sense.
Catnip Hardy
I WAS SO EXCITED TO LEARN ABOUT SPOOKY THINGS IN A SEEMINGLY SAFE ENVIRONMENT AND THEN YOU SEND PENNYWISE AT THE END. A dislike!
Al Shocka
I live in Williamsport Pennsylvania. There are many amazing houses/buildings like in this video, throughout the city. There were more millionares in Williamsport then any other city in the USA in the late 1800's early 1900's. The area where a lot of these homes were built is called millionares row. The details inside are amazing, designed and crafted from the best masons, wood workers, and metal smith's from around the world at that time.
Darkvine
"Morbidly antisocial and mysteriously wealthy" --- I like the sound of that 💀🎩🧐😜
Martin Jones
It might also be because whilst it is Gothic in style (from Albert) the Victorians also had a fascination with the 'other side' and often held seances and told Ghost stories.
Mark the Demystifier
I think there are other reasons too. We associate neo-gothic architecture with Victorian gothic literature. The Victorians also gave us Spiritualism with seances in parlours etc and I think this gave us an association in the popular consciousness that never faded. In the UK, film makers like Hammer cemented it further. They would often use the same house in several films! Lastly, Victorian gothic architecture, being inspired by cathedrals and castles has an association with haunted castles and graveyards and well... it just looks spooky!
Mark the Demystifier
Great video
Vitaliy Zakharov
Whoever made this video has zero understanding of 19th century architecture. Those houses weren't McMansions of the time. They weren't cheaply or improperly built.
Franz Liszt
aCTUaLLy THaTs CaLLed SECoNd EmPIrE

Your welcome architecture majors
Lobo
*Read more*
David Gonzalez-Herrera
The video creator completely missed that in the 19th century, spiritualism and occultism had become very prevalent in America. Mediums and Gypsies were common. This was around the time when the Oujia boards started to appear. Also, who can forget the elephant in the room; the winchester mystery house. I live a few streets away from it. Its the culmination of Victorian age spiritualism manifest into a mansion. Either the creator of the video does not know his history well, or he purposely chose to neglect these facts. Victorian age homes long had that horror feel long before the Adams family. Since the 1800s and there inception these houses developed that persona with growing spiritualism. Sarah Winchester redefined, and along with others gave meaning to the concept of a scary victorian home.
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The (mostly) true story of hobo Why the Victorian mansion is a horror icon 2 days ago   05:37

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What we know about hobo graffiti comes from hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories.

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Hobos, or tramps, were itinerant workers and wanderers who illegally hopped freight cars on the newly expanding railroad in the United States in the late 19th century. They used graffiti, also known as tramp writing, as a messaging system to tell their fellow travelers where they were and where they were going. Hobos would carve or draw their road persona, or moniker, on stationary objects near railroad tracks, like water towers and bridges.

But news stories at the time spread tales of a different kind of graffiti. They included coded symbols that were supposedly drawn on fence posts and houses to convey simple messages to tramps. Seeing an image of a cat on a fence post indicated “kind lady lives here,” for example. While this language probably existed to a certain extent, it certainly was not as widespread as the media led readers to believe. In reality, these stories were largely informed by hobos — a group that took pride in embellishing stories so they could remain elusive.

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